Author : Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Publisher : Beacon Press
Release :2014-09-16
Total pages :312
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780807000410

2015 Recipient of the American Book Award The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: “The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them.” Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples’ history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

Author : Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Publisher : Beacon Press
Release :2019-07-23
Total pages :280
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780807049402

2020 American Indian Youth Literature Young Adult Honor Book 2020 Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People,selected by National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and the Children’s Book Council 2019 Best-Of Lists: Best YA Nonfiction of 2019 (Kirkus Reviews) · Best Nonfiction of 2019 (School Library Journal) · Best Books for Teens (New York Public Library) · Best Informational Books for Older Readers (Chicago Public Library) Spanning more than 400 years, this classic bottom-up history examines the legacy of Indigenous peoples’ resistance, resilience, and steadfast fight against imperialism. Going beyond the story of America as a country “discovered” by a few brave men in the “New World,” Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.

Author : Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz,Dina Gilio-Whitaker
Publisher : Beacon Press
Release :2016
Total pages :208
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780807062654

Scholars and activists Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture and history. Tracing how these ideas evolved, the authors disrupt long-held and enduring myths such as: "Thanksgiving Proves the Indians Welcomed Pilgrims", "Indians Were Savage and Warlike", "Europeans Brought Civilization to Backward Indians", "Sports Mascots Honor Native Americans", "Most Indians Are on Government Welfare", "Indian Casinos Make Them All Rich", and "Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcohol. Each chapter shows how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of a settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land.

Author : Mary-Ellen Kelm,Keith D. Smith
Publisher : University of Toronto Press
Release :2018-10-26
Total pages :248
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9781487587352

"Talking Back to the Indian Act: Critical Readings in Settler Colonial Histories is a comprehensive "How To" guide for engaging with primary documents. The intent of this text is to encourage students to develop the skills necessary to converse with the primary sources in more refined and profound ways. As a piece of legislation central to Canada's relationship with Indigenous people and communities and that has undergone many amendments, the Indian Act is uniquely positioned to act as a vehicle for this kind of pedagogical goal. Through analyzing 35 sources pertaining to the Indian Act that address governance, gender, enfranchisement, and land, the authors hope that students develop critical skills related to analyzing primary documents and come away with a much better understanding of this pivotal piece of legislation as well as the dynamics involved in its creation and maintenance. Kelm and Smith have included a diverse set of sources including interviews, debates in the House of Commons on the Indian Act, memoranda, and letters. In their introduction, Kelm and Smith provide background on the Indian Act and then offer two methodologies (one non-indigenous and one indigenous) for thinking historically about the Act: the 5Cs and the 4Rs. The authors have included 7 maps and 14 images to visually contextualize their narrative. Appendix A includes a thoughtful set of questions to stimulate student thinking about how historical sources come to be, how they are formed and what impact they have both at the time they are created and afterwards. Appendix B contains a historical context timeline for the Indian Act."--

Author : Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Publisher : Singapore Books
Release :2014-08-05
Total pages :329
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN :

The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. In An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or...

Author : Howard Zinn
Publisher : Aristotext
Release :1996
Total pages :675
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN :

In this Second Edition of this radical social history of America from Columbus to the present, Howard Zinn includes substantial coverage of the Carter, Reagan and Bush years and an Afterword on the Clinton presidency. Its commitment and vigorous style mean it will be compelling reading for under-graduate and post-graduate students and scholars in American social history and American studies, as well as the general reader.

Author : Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
Release :2007
Total pages :239
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 0806138335

In New Mexico—once a Spanish colony, then part of Mexico—Pueblo Indians and descendants of Spanish- and Mexican-era settlers still think of themselves as distinct peoples, each with a dynamic history. At the core of these persistent cultural identities is each group's historical relationship to the others and to the land, a connection that changed dramatically when the United States wrested control of the region from Mexico in 1848.

Author : Robin D.G. Kelley
Publisher : Beacon Press
Release :2002-06-27
Total pages :264
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780807009789

Kelley unearths freedom dreams in this exciting history of renegade intellectuals and artists of the African diaspora in the twentieth century. Focusing on the visions of activists from C. L. R. James to Aime Cesaire and Malcolm X, Kelley writes of the hope that Communism offered, the mindscapes of Surrealism, the transformative potential of radical feminism, and of the four-hundred-year-old dream of reparations for slavery and Jim Crow. From'the preeminent historian of black popular culture' (Cornel West), an inspiring work on the power of imagination to transform society. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Author : Kim E. Nielsen
Publisher : Beacon Press
Release :2012-10-02
Total pages :272
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780807022030

The first book to cover the entirety of disability history, from pre-1492 to the present Disability is not just the story of someone we love or the story of whom we may become; rather it is undoubtedly the story of our nation. Covering the entirety of US history from pre-1492 to the present, A Disability History of the United States is the first book to place the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American narrative. In many ways, it’s a familiar telling. In other ways, however, it is a radical repositioning of US history. By doing so, the book casts new light on familiar stories, such as slavery and immigration, while breaking ground about the ties between nativism and oralism in the late nineteenth century and the role of ableism in the development of democracy. A Disability History of the United States pulls from primary-source documents and social histories to retell American history through the eyes, words, and impressions of the people who lived it. As historian and disability scholar Nielsen argues, to understand disability history isn’t to narrowly focus on a series of individual triumphs but rather to examine mass movements and pivotal daily events through the lens of varied experiences. Throughout the book, Nielsen deftly illustrates how concepts of disability have deeply shaped the American experience—from deciding who was allowed to immigrate to establishing labor laws and justifying slavery and gender discrimination. Included are absorbing—at times horrific—narratives of blinded slaves being thrown overboard and women being involuntarily sterilized, as well as triumphant accounts of disabled miners organizing strikes and disability rights activists picketing Washington. Engrossing and profound, A Disability History of the United States fundamentally reinterprets how we view our nation’s past: from a stifling master narrative to a shared history that encompasses us all.

Author : Howard Zinn
Publisher : Seven Stories Press
Release :2011-01-04
Total pages :464
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9781583229453

A Young People's History of the United States brings to US history the viewpoints of workers, slaves, immigrants, women, Native Americans, and others whose stories, and their impact, are rarely included in books for young people. A Young People's History of the United States is also a companion volume to The People Speak, the film adapted from A People's History of the United States and Voices of a People’s History of the United States. Beginning with a look at Christopher Columbus’s arrival through the eyes of the Arawak Indians, then leading the reader through the struggles for workers’ rights, women’s rights, and civil rights during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and ending with the current protests against continued American imperialism, Zinn in the volumes of A Young People’s History of the United States presents a radical new way of understanding America’s history. In so doing, he reminds readers that America’s true greatness is shaped by our dissident voices, not our military generals.