Author : Michelle Alexander
Publisher : The New Press
Release :2020-01-07
Total pages :434
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9781620971949

Named one of the most important nonfiction books of the 21st century by Entertainment Weekly‚ Slate‚ Chronicle of Higher Eduction‚ Literary Hub, Book Riot‚ and Zora A tenth-anniversary edition of the iconic bestseller—“one of the most influential books of the past 20 years,” according to the Chronicle of Higher Education—with a new preface by the author “It is in no small part thanks to Alexander’s account that civil rights organizations such as Black Lives Matter have focused so much of their energy on the criminal justice system.” —Adam Shatz, London Review of Books Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander’s unforgettable argument that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is “undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S.” Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today.

Author : Ryan Moore
Publisher : CRC Press
Release :2017-07-05
Total pages :329
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9781351351478

Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness is an unflinching dissection of the racial biases built into the American prison system. Named after the laws that enforced racial segregation in the southern United States until the mid-1960s, The New Jim Crow argues that while America is now legally a colorblind society - treating all races equally under the law - many factors combine to build profound racial weighting into the legal system. The US now has the world's highest rate of incarceration, and a disproportionate percentage of the prison population is comprised of African-American men. Alexander's argument is that different legal factors have combined to mean both that African-Americans are more likely to be targeted by police, and to receive long jail sentences for their crimes. While many of Alexander's arguments and statistics are to be found in other books and authors' work, The New Jim Crow is a masterful example of the reasoning skills that communicate arguments persuasively. Alexander's skills are those fundamental to critical thinking reasoning: organizing evidence, examining other sides of the question, and synthesizing points to create an overall argument that is as watertight as it is persuasive.

Author : Daniel Hunter
Publisher :
Release :2015-05-01
Total pages :80
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 0988550830

Expanding on the call to action in Michelle Alexander's acclaimed best-seller, The New Jim Crow, this accessible organizing guide puts tools in your hands to help you and your group understand how to make meaningful, effective change. Learn about your role in movement-building and how to pick and build campaigns that contribute towards a bigger mass movement against the largest penal system in the world. This important new resource offers examples from this and other movements, time-tested organizing techniques, and vision to inspire, challenge, and motivate.

Author : FastDigest-Summary
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release :2018-04-08
Total pages :34
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 1987682823

A Complete Summary of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness The New Jim Crow is a book written by Michelle Alexander. The book is about the increased percentage of incarceration among the African-American population in the United States and the segregation that is imposed on them and that controls them. The new Jim Crow is actually a continuation of the Jim Crow legal system which was present in the United States of America prior to the Civil War. Back then, the African American people were deemed second-class citizens, which meant that they had no rights. This meant that African-American people had no right to vote, no right to participate in the judicial or legal system, and had no representatives of their own in the entire legal system. The mistreatment of the African American people did not end when these things ended; in fact, the problems regarding segregation of African-American people are still present today. Michelle Alexander's book is here to show us the truth about segregation, which is often hidden through political promises or even negligence. The New Jim Crow is an interesting, eye-opening book, which everyone should read in order to understand the issues of continued racial segregation in the United States. Our summary is divided into several sections: first we will summarize the book, and try to learn as much as we can about what the author is trying to say. After this, we will have an analysis of the book and then a quiz with answers to test you knowledge. Finally, we will give you a short conclusion just to review everything we have learned. So, let's get started. Here Is A Preview Of What You Will Get: - In The New Jim Crow, you will get a summarized version of the book. - In The New Jim Crow, you will find the book analyzed to further strengthen your knowledge. - In The New Jim Crow, you will get some fun multiple choice quizzes, along with answers to help you learn about the book. Get a copy, and learn everything about The New Jim Crow .

Author : Veterans of Hope
Publisher : Lulu.com
Release :2015
Total pages :57
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9781304489197

Drawing from and expanding on the themes of Michelle Alexander's acclaimed best-seller, The New Jim Crow, this in-depth guide provides a launching pad for groups wishing to engage in deep, meaningful dialogue about race, racism, and structural inequality in the age of mass incarceration. The Study Guide and Call to Action spans the entirety of The New Jim Crow, engaging the critical questions of how we managed to create, nearly overnight, a penal system unprecedented in world history, and how that system actually functions - as opposed to the way it is advertised. This important new resource also challenges us to search for and admit the truth about ourselves, our own biases, stereotypes, and misconceptions, and the many ways in which we might actually be part of the problem.

Author : Michelle Alexander,FastReads
Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release :2017-04-06
Total pages :24
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 1545194602

Don't miss this summary of Michelle Alexander's controversial and eye-opening book: "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness." This FastReads' Summary provides chapter synopses, key takeaways, and analysis to help you fully digest this stunning and explosive criticism of the modern racial caste system in America. What Will You Learn from Reading This Book? The history of racism, slavery, Jim Crow, and modern discrimination in America Evidence behind the systematic incarceration of black people in America How the stigma of black criminals isn't just for criminals The viscous cycle of crime and recidivism in black communities The racially-driven double standards that penetrate the American justice system How these current injustices were intentionally engineered to replace the old Jim Crow and maintain racial inequality Book Summary Overview Obama's election as the president might have seemed like the dawn of a new era of colorblindness in America, but Alexander argues that we are far from eradicating racism-we have just redesigned it. Alexander also presents sufficient evidence to help the reader come to terms with the horrifying realities of modern racism. Ultimately, she concludes that although the prison system is supposed to reform people, it acts primarily as method of control and servitude in America-very much like slavery. Alexander's disarming voice and candor make this an incredible book, despite the grimness of its overarching themes. Click Buy Now with 1-Click to Own Your Copy Today! Please note: This is a summary, analysis and review of the book and not the original book.

Author : Martin Luther King, Jr.
Publisher : Beacon Press
Release :2016
Total pages :320
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780807034521

A revealing collection that restores Dr. King as being every bit as radical as Malcolm X “The radical King was a democratic socialist who sided with poor and working people in the class struggle taking place in capitalist societies. . . . The response of the radical King to our catastrophic moment can be put in one word: revolution—a revolution in our priorities, a reevaluation of our values, a reinvigoration of our public life, and a fundamental transformation of our way of thinking and living that promotes a transfer of power from oligarchs and plutocrats to everyday people and ordinary citizens. . . . Could it be that we know so little of the radical King because such courage defies our market-driven world?” —Cornel West, from the Introduction Every year, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is celebrated as one of the greatest orators in US history, an ambassador for nonviolence who became perhaps the most recognizable leader of the civil rights movement. But after more than forty years, few people appreciate how truly radical he was. Arranged thematically in four parts, The Radical King includes twenty-three selections, curated and introduced by Dr. Cornel West, that illustrate King's revolutionary vision, underscoring his identification with the poor, his unapologetic opposition to the Vietnam War, and his crusade against global imperialism. As West writes, “Although much of America did not know the radical King—and too few know today—the FBI and US government did. They called him 'the most dangerous man in America.' . . . This book unearths a radical King that we can no longer sanitize.” From the Hardcover edition.

Author : William C. Rhoden
Publisher : Broadway Books
Release :2010-02-10
Total pages :304
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780307565747

From Jackie Robinson to Muhammad Ali and Arthur Ashe, African American athletes have been at the center of modern culture, their on-the-field heroics admired and stratospheric earnings envied. But for all their money, fame, and achievement, says New York Times columnist William C. Rhoden, black athletes still find themselves on the periphery of true power in the multibillion-dollar industry their talent built. Provocative and controversial, Rhoden’s $40 Million Slaves weaves a compelling narrative of black athletes in the United States, from the plantation to their beginnings in nineteenth-century boxing rings to the history-making accomplishments of notable figures such as Jesse Owens, Althea Gibson, and Willie Mays. Rhoden reveals that black athletes’ “evolution” has merely been a journey from literal plantations—where sports were introduced as diversions to quell revolutionary stirrings—to today’s figurative ones, in the form of collegiate and professional sports programs. He details the “conveyor belt” that brings kids from inner cities and small towns to big-time programs, where they’re cut off from their roots and exploited by team owners, sports agents, and the media. He also sets his sights on athletes like Michael Jordan, who he says have abdicated their responsibility to the community with an apathy that borders on treason. The power black athletes have today is as limited as when masters forced their slaves to race and fight. The primary difference is, today’s shackles are often the athletes’ own making.

Author : Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Publisher : Penguin
Release :2019-04-02
Total pages :320
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780525559542

The New York Times bestseller. A profound new rendering of the struggle by African-Americans for equality after the Civil War and the violent counter-revolution that resubjugated them, as seen through the prism of the war of images and ideas that have left an enduring racist stain on the American mind. The abolition of slavery in the aftermath of the Civil War is a familiar story, as is the civil rights revolution that transformed the nation after World War II. But the century in between remains a mystery: if emancipation sparked "a new birth of freedom" in Lincoln's America, why was it necessary to march in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s America? In this new book, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., one of our leading chroniclers of the African-American experience, seeks to answer that question in a history that moves from the Reconstruction Era to the "nadir" of the African-American experience under Jim Crow, through to World War I and the Harlem Renaissance. Through his close reading of the visual culture of this tragic era, Gates reveals the many faces of Jim Crow and how, together, they reinforced a stark color line between white and black Americans. Bringing a lifetime of wisdom to bear as a scholar, filmmaker, and public intellectual, Gates uncovers the roots of structural racism in our own time, while showing how African Americans after slavery combatted it by articulating a vision of a "New Negro" to force the nation to recognize their humanity and unique contributions to America as it hurtled toward the modern age. The story Gates tells begins with great hope, with the Emancipation Proclamation, Union victory, and the liberation of nearly 4 million enslaved African-Americans. Until 1877, the federal government, goaded by the activism of Frederick Douglass and many others, tried at various turns to sustain their new rights. But the terror unleashed by white paramilitary groups in the former Confederacy, combined with deteriorating economic conditions and a loss of Northern will, restored "home rule" to the South. The retreat from Reconstruction was followed by one of the most violent periods in our history, with thousands of black people murdered or lynched and many more afflicted by the degrading impositions of Jim Crow segregation. An essential tour through one of America's fundamental historical tragedies, Stony the Road is also a story of heroic resistance, as figures such as W. E. B. Du Bois and Ida B. Wells fought to create a counter-narrative, and culture, inside the lion's mouth. As sobering as this tale is, it also has within it the inspiration that comes with encountering the hopes our ancestors advanced against the longest odds.

Author : James Forman, Jr.
Publisher : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release :2017-04-18
Total pages :320
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES
ISBN : 9780374712907

In recent years, America’s criminal justice system has become the subject of an increasingly urgent debate. Critics have assailed the rise of mass incarceration, emphasizing its disproportionate impact on people of color. As James Forman, Jr., points out, however, the war on crime that began in the 1970s was supported by many African American leaders in the nation’s urban centers. In Locking Up Our Own, he seeks to understand why. Forman shows us that the first substantial cohort of black mayors, judges, and police chiefs took office amid a surge in crime and drug addiction. Many prominent black officials, including Washington, D.C. mayor Marion Barry and federal prosecutor Eric Holder, feared that the gains of the civil rights movement were being undermined by lawlessness—and thus embraced tough-on-crime measures, including longer sentences and aggressive police tactics. In the face of skyrocketing murder rates and the proliferation of open-air drug markets, they believed they had no choice. But the policies they adopted would have devastating consequences for residents of poor black neighborhoods. A former D.C. public defender, Forman tells riveting stories of politicians, community activists, police officers, defendants, and crime victims. He writes with compassion about individuals trapped in terrible dilemmas—from the men and women he represented in court to officials struggling to respond to a public safety emergency. Locking Up Our Own enriches our understanding of why our society became so punitive and offers important lessons to anyone concerned about the future of race and the criminal justice system in this country.